Stories

38
results found
1 - 20 of 38 Results
Date:
The Women Economic Empowerment Congress (WEE Congress) lasted two days in a row and gathered more than 100 Ukrainian businesswomen, representatives of the private and public sectors, as well as the academic community. The event took place on November 21-22 in a hybrid format: offline in Lviv and with an online broadcast.
Date:
Olha Svitlychna has been building her career in the security sector for five years now. Olha was born in Mariupol. At the age of 24, she became a Commissioner for Human Rights appointed by the Head of the National Police. Over time, she became Head of the Department of International Cooperation at the Donetsk State University of Internal Affairs.
Date:
Iryna Zalialova is a police colonel in the Ukraine National Police service. She leads the Department for Monitoring Gender Equality and efforts to combat domestic violence under the Human Rights Compliance Department. Until 2014, Zalialova lived in Horlivka and worked at the Donetsk Law Institute. When pro-Russian militants entered the Donetsk region, Zalialova and her family were forced to flee to Kyiv. Already in the capital of Ukraine, she decided to try out for the National Police: she passed the competition and got a job as a precinct officer.
Date:
My goal is to show that it is not necessary to move abroad, somewhere to earn money, but you can realize yourself in business in Ukraine, even during the war.
Date:
With more than 20 years of experience helping women from vulnerable groups across the Ukraine, Lyubov Maksymovych heads the NGO "Women's Perspectives", whose work has become more relevant and necessary than ever since the country’s full-scale invasion. In February, her team created a temporary shelter for internally displaced people that has already hosted nearly 600 women and children. Recently, the NGO received funding from the United Nations Women’s Peace and Humanitarian Fund (WPHF), aimed at providing vital assistance to women and girls affected by the war in Ukraine. The NGO also helps women find jobs, provides psychological and legal aid, offers social support and works as a support hub for other women’s organizations in eight regions of Ukraine.
Date:
Anastasia Perepylytsia, 44, is no stranger to displacement. In 2014, she had a stable job in finance and lived a normal life together with her husband and two children in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine. But when the Russian army invaded her hometown, she had to flee with her family to Zaporizhzhia, a city situated on the banks of the Dnieper River in the south-east.
Date:
Nina Cherlenuk is one of the millions of Ukrainians who have been forced to leave their homes since the beginning of the war in February. For women, a new city or country often means career changes – a new workplace, a new company, or an entirely new profession. However, in the context of war, the transition tends to be more complex.
Date:
Anna Mazur is a founder of the Ukrainian career platform Happy Monday and the NGO Professionals of the Future. This summer, her team conducted research on the current state of the Ukrainian market: how many women are actively looking for work, which positions are most in demand, and which skills are necessary for success. With the support of UN Women, Mazur launched a career and psychological assistance project for Ukrainian women.
Date:
Larysa Denysenko is a journalist, attorney, human rights activist and co-founder of the Association of Women’s Lawyers of Ukraine “JurFem”. Before the war, Denysenko and JurFem mainly advocated for women’s leadership in legal professions, provided mentorship and supported strategic court cases related to domestic violence and gender-based discrimination. Now, this has extended to representing the interests of those who have survived conflict-related sexual violence allegedly perpetrated by the Russian military in Ukraine.
Date:
Currently, 15.7 million people in Ukraine are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance and protection. Attacks on populated civilian areas and infrastructure continue in eastern and southern parts of Ukraine, endangering people’s lives and access to basic services. UN Women Ukraine has reprogrammed its activities to reach those women and men that are most in need of essential items not available in the territories experiencing the fiercest attacks in the eastern Donetsk region.
Date:
As of 25 March, more than 10 million people had been forcibly displaced by the war in Ukraine, with more than 3.7 million fleeing to neighbouring countries. To gage the differential impacts of the war and the specific needs of vulnerable groups, UN Women and CARE International produced a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) and drew out recommendations on how to improve humanitarian responses.
Date:
As the war in Ukraine continues to take its toll on women and girls, UN Women reiterates the UN Secretary-General’s urgent call for peace. The war must stop now.
Date:
Rural women face multiple forms of discrimination and are extremely vulnerable amid Russia’s military invasion. Sofia Burtak founded the Rural Women Business Network NGO in 2016, which now unites over 300 rural women, including farmers, self-government officials and others. It is actively engaged in supporting the rights of rural women and advocating for a gender-sensitive agricultural sector that takes the interests of women farmers and women’s agricultural businesses more into account. Burtak explains that since Russia first invaded Ukraine in 2014, rural women have been bearing an immense burden in caring for families, ensuring food supply for the army and hosting millions of internally displaced Ukrainians.
Date:
Millions of people have been fleeing their homes in Ukraine since the Russian invasion on 24 February 2022 turned into a full-fledged war. In Cahul, a border region in the south of the Republic of Moldova, local public authorities, volunteers and civil society are doing what they can to help, guide and host those on the move.
Date:
As a result of the Russian Federation’s military invasion of Ukraine, close to 2 million people have been internally displaced inside the country and more than 3 million refugees have already crossed international borders. As of 13 March 2022, there were 106,994 refugees from Ukraine in Moldova, most being women and children. This is also the case of an extended family of 12 members of the Roma community who were forced to flee their homes in the village of Arbuzinka, Mykolaiv Oblast, Ukraine, to seek safety, protection and assistance in the Republic of Moldova.
Date:
More than 400,000 people from Ukraine have crossed into the Republic of Moldova since Russia’s invasion on 24 February. According to Moldova’s Bureau for Migration and Asylum, over 1,600 Ukrainians had requested asylum as of 10 March.
Date:
The war has severely impacted social cohesion, community security and the resilience of local communities, especially women and girls. Lack of access to social services including schools and strained community resources have increased the care burden of local women who responsible for the care for children, disabled and elderly family members.
Date:
On 24 February, Natalia, Irina and Cristina, three friends and mothers from Odessa, woke up to the sound of air-raid sirens and explosions. Russia’s military offensive had begun.
Date:
In the two weeks since Russia began its military offensive in Ukraine, more than 1,5 million people have fled their homes, the vast majority women and children. Those who flock to border crossings – and those who stay behind to defend their country – face immense risks, hardship and scarcity. Meet just a few of the women we spoke to on the front lines of the crisis in Chernivtsi.
Date:
Across Ukraine on 24 February, people awoke to the sounds of sirens and explosions as Russia began its military attack. Since that morning, more than 870,000 Ukrainians – the vast majority women and children – have fled to neighbouring countries.